Menu
Banner - Faculty of Graduate and Postdoctoral Studies

Human and Molecular Genetics (PhD) (Collaborative)

Back to Program List
 

This is a collaborative graduate specialization in human and molecular genetics at master's and doctoral level. The primary graduate programs in biochemistry (BCH), cellular and molecular medicine (CMM) and neuroscience (NSC) all collaborate in offering the specialization. The degree awarded specifies the primary program and indicates "specialization in human and molecular genetics".

Students must meet the admission and curriculum requirements of their primary program as well as the specific requirements of the collaborative program.

Members of the program include scientists with interest and expertise in the following areas: developmental genetics, neuromuscular disease, microbial genetics, host resistance, cancer biology, aging, development of novel molecular therapeutics, gene therapy, growth and development, auto-immune diseases, molecular biology of viruses, bacteria and parasites, genetic epidemiology, retinal development and disease, animal models of human disease, molecular aspects of signal transduction.

The programs are governed by the general regulations of the Faculty of Graduate and Postdoctoral Studies (FGPS).

Search all research fields for members of the teaching staff

The professors included in the list below are members of the Faculty of Graduate and Postdoctoral Studies. This means that they are authorized to supervise or co-supervise theses. A complete list of the faculty and staff members associated with the program can be found at




ADDISON, Christina, Cross-appointment
Angiogenisis; cancer; extracellular matrix

BELL, John, Cross-appointment
Ocolytic viruses; protein translation; cancer therapeutics

BENNETT, Steffany, Associate Professor
Neuroregeneration; degeneration; apoptosis; stem cells; Gap junctions; Alzheimer's; transgenic mouse models

BLAIS, Alexandre
Our lab studies the six family of transcription factors and the critical role its members play in muscle development; we are interested in understanding, at the molecular level, the mode of action of these transcription factors

BOURGAULT, Yves, Full Professor
Computational fluid dynamics; numerical methods; finite element; continuum mechanics modelling

BOYCOTT, Kym Marie, Cross-appointment

BROWN, Earl, Full Professor
Viruses: genetics; evolution; pathogenesis; Reovirus, Influenza; Hepatitis C; oncolytic viruses; pneumonia

BULMAN, Dennis, Cross-appointment
Human genetics; linkage analysis; disease gene identification; myoclonus dystonia; Parkinson's; brachydactyly

CHAKRABORTY, Pranesh

DIMITROULAKOS, Jim, Cross-appointment
Experimental therapeutics; cancer; targeted therapy

DIMOCK, Ken, Full Professor
Virus receptors, virus entry

GRAY, Douglas, Cross-appointment
Proteins inside cells are normally degraded through elaborate and highly regulated cellular machinery; and failure to do so underlies many disease states, we are studying the role of protein degradation in neurodegenerative diseases; lung cancer and aging; these conditions are studied using transgenic mice

KORNELUK, Robert, Cross-appointment
Modulation of programmed cell death (apoptosis) for therapeutic benefit in disease

KOTHARY, Rashmi, Cross-appointment
Sodium channels and neuromuscular disease; survival motor neuron gene and spinal muscular atrophy (SMA, transgenic mouse models of neuromuscular disease; cytoskeletal cross linker proteins and cytoarchitecture integrity; ntegrins and myelination

LIU, Qing Yan, Adjunct Professor
Molecular genetics; genomics; apoptosis; neurodegeneration; DNA microarray; bioinformatics

LIU, Xingquan Johne, Adjunct Professor
Hormonal regulation of egg maturation; nongenomic action of progesterone in the Xenopus oocyte

LORIMER, Ian A.J., Cross-appointment
Cancer therapeutics targeting a mutant oncogenic EGF receptor

MACKENZIE, Alexander, Cross-appointment
Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA); role of neuronal apoptosis inhibitory peptide

MCBURNEY, Michael, Cross-appointment
Molecular basis of gene silencing in mammalian cells

MCKAY, Bruce, Cross-appointment
Work in the lab is focused on understanding the cellular responses to DNA damage

MCPHERSON, Phyllis, Cross-appointment
Regulation of HDL receptors; cholesterol trafficking, atherothrombotic risk

MEGENEY, Lynn A., Cross-appointment
Lessons learned from the mdx: MyoD(-/-) mouse

NEMER, Mona, Full Professor
Molecular mechanisms involved in cellular growth and differentiation, particularly as this relates to heart failure and congenital heart diseases

PARKS, Robin, Cross-appointment
Development and characterization of adenoviral vectors deleted of all viral protein coding sequences for use in gene therapy; characterization of host immune responses to gene therapy vectors and foreign (therapeutic) proteins, investigating novel therapeutics for the treatment and correction of muscular dystrophies and cancer

PICKETTS, David, Cross-appointment
Genetics diseases

RUDNICKI, Michael, Cross-appointment
Stem cells; myogenesis; embryogenesis; molecular biology; transcriptional regulation; gene expression; cell cycle; signal transduction; cell differentiation; gene targeting; MyoD-family (MyoD, Myf5, myogenin, MRF4); Pax7; Rb-family (Rb, p107, p130)

SABOURIN, Luc, Cross-appointment
Areas of plasticity and cellular remodeling; as well as in Myotonic Dystrophy (DM)

STEWART, Alexandre, Cross-appointment
Inherited cardiovascular disorders; genetic risk factors for Coronary Artery Disease

STOJDL, David, Cross-appointment

TESSON, Frédérique, Cross-appointment
Idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy, genetic predictors of weight loss in obese women

TSIFILDIS, Catherine, Cross-appointment
1) Molecular aspects of forelimb and lens regeneration in the newt, Notophthalmus viridescens; 2) dedifferentiation as a source of stem cells in the regeneration process, 3) gene therapy in retinal degeneration using XIAP, a potent inhibitor of apoptosis; 4) stem cell applications to retinal damage or disease

VANDERHYDEN, Barbara, Cross-appointment
Molecular studies on ovarian cancer; ovarian follicular development; production of transgenic mice

WALLACE, Valerie, Cross-appointment
Retinal and optical nerve development; Sonic Hedgehog protein signaling

YAO, Zemin, Full Professor
Factors required for hepatic assembly and secretion of apoB-containing lipoproteins; the LDL-receptor binding domain(s) within human apoB100; mechanisms responsible for the intracellular degradation of newly synthesized apoB, Structure/function relationships within LRP (the LDL-receptor Related Protein) and its potential role in post-prendial fat absorption by the adipose tissue

Candidates are admitted through the master's or doctoral program either in biochemistry (BCH) or cellular and molecular medicine (CMM) or neuroscience (NSC) and must therefore meet the admission requirements of those programs. Transfer from master's to doctoral level without completing a master's thesis is permitted in the collaborative program under the same conditions as in the primary programs. Proficiency in English is required. Candidates should indicate in their initial application for admission into the primary program that they wish to be accepted into the collaborative program. To be accepted, the thesis director must be a member of the collaborative program. Students will normally be informed about their acceptance into the collaborative program at the same time as being informed about their admission into the primary program.

Additional Information

For detailed information about the primary participating graduate programs, consult the relevant sections of the graduate calendar at the web address: www.grad.uOttawa.ca.

Students are also advised to consult the General Regulations of the Faculty of Graduate and Postdoctoral Studies (FGPS) at the web address: www.grad.uOttawa.ca.

Transfer from Master’s to PhD Program

Following transfer, all the requirements of the HMG doctoral program must be met: six credits of courses including three HMG credits, the seminar in the primary program, comprehensive exam, presentation of one research seminar, and the thesis.

The student is responsible for fulfilling both the participating unit requirements for the primary program and the requirements for the collaborative program.

  • Six credits of courses, three credits of which must be from the student’s primary program and three of which must be HMG credits.
  • Enrolment in the seminar course, presentation of one seminar and active participation in the seminar series in the student’s primary program.
  • Comprehensive examination as required by the primary program.
  • Presentation of one research seminar to the primary program prior to thesis submission.
  • Presentation and successful defence of a thesis based on original research carried out under the direct supervision of a member of the collaborative program.

Course selection is subject to the approval of the HMG program director.

Comprehensive Examination

The examination is subject to the regulations in place for the student’s primary program.

Residence

As per FGPS regulations, all students must complete a minimum of six sessions of full-time registration at the beginning of the program. All requests for non-consecutive full-time study sessions will need to be approved by the FGPS. The program is intended for full-time students.

Minimum Standards

The passing grade in all courses is C+. Students who fail two courses (equivalent to 6 credits), the thesis proposal, or the comprehensive exam or whose research progress is deemed unsatisfactory are required to withdraw.

HMG8103 ADVANCED TOPICS IN THE MOLECULAR BIOLOGY OF HUMAN DISEASES I (3cr.)
Topics will be selected and representative of current developments in the field. The course consists of a repeated series of a 3 hour lecture by an expert in the field one week, followed by student presentations, discussions and critique of assigned papers on that topic the following week. Topics on selected diseases will focus on various aspects of cancer, apoptosis, disease gene identification and gene therapy. In the past these topics have included the molecular aspects of various cancers, spinal muscular atrophy, tissue regeneration, the discovery of disease genes, infectious disease (HIV) and gene therapy. Students will write a grant proposal and participate in mock grant review panels. Depending on enrolment, the course may be limited to HMG students only. Prerequisite: Permission of the HMG program director.

HMG8105 / BCH8105 ADVANCED TOPICS IN THE MOLECULAR BIOLOGY OF HUMAN DISEASES II (3cr.)
Topics will be selected and representative of current developments in the field. The course consists of a repeated series of a 3 hour lecture by an expert in the field one week, followed by student presentations, discussions and critique of assigned papers on that topic the following week. Topics on selected diseases will focus on various aspects of cancer, apoptosis, disease gene identification and gene therapy. In the past these topics have included the molecular aspects of various cancers, spinal muscular atrophy, tissue regeneration, the discovery of disease genes, infectious disease (HIV) and gene therapy. Students will write a grant proposal and participate in mock grant review panels. Depending on enrolment, the course may be limited to HMG students only. Prerequisite: Permission of the HMG program director.

HMG8600 SPECIAL TOPICS IN HUMAN AND MOLECULAR GENETICS (3cr.)
Current topics in molecular genetics, developmental genetics, cancer genetics, neurogenetics, population genetics, clinical genetics and other areas depending on available expertise and interest expressed. Offered alternate years subject to sufficient demand. Prerequisite: Permission of the course coordinator.

Coordinates not available